Guest post: Underrated Activities That Promote Whole Health

Picture1

Underrated Activities That Promote Whole Health

By Brad Krause

Eat breakfast, don’t drink too much, smile and be happy — these are pretty basic aspects of a healthy lifestyle. But if this is all you are doing, you are seriously missing out. There are many ways to cater to your self-care needs. From the ancient practice of bath therapy to modern-day motivators, the following are a few of the most under-appreciated ways to live your best life.

 

Take a Warm Bath

The ancient Romans provided public bathhouses, and it wasn’t to ensure proper hygiene. Bathhouses were considered meeting places, but they also provided heat, warmth, and relaxation. Traditional Medicinals explains that bath therapy, also known as balneotherapy, is used to relax muscles and promote skin health. A warm bath in the afternoon is a great way to center your thoughts and settle in for another important aspect of self-care: sleep.

 

Go to Bed Early

Sleep is good for you for many reasons. It allows your body to recover from daily trauma and gives your mind an outlet to process the billions of bits of information that were thrown at you during the day. Make a conscious effort to get eight hours of sleep every night, and you will quickly realize that you have more energy, less stress, and feel better overall.

 

Exercise

 

It’s no secret that physical activity is crucial for your health. However, it is important to note that you don’t have to conform to a specific exercise program to reap the benefits. You also do not have to be 25 and in the best shape of your life to work out. In fact, seniors benefit just as much — and probably more so — than their recent-college-grad counterparts. No matter your age, you can get regular exercise by attending workout classes at a local facility, setting up a workout space at home, or simply doing things that would make you more active during the day like going for a walk or taking the stairs to work.

 

Track Your Activities

Exercising occasionally is not enough. One of the biggest benefits of working out is that it can help reduce the effects of stress. Keep yourself motivated to move by tracking your daily activities. For example, the Apple Watch Series 4 is great for seniors since it includes a built-in heart rate monitor. Of course, if you don’t want to spend several hundred dollars on a fitness tracker, Digital Trends lists several models that are less than $100, including the Withings Move, which looks more like a tradition analog timepiece.

 

Try Acupuncture

Acupuncture is not a new-age treatment. This ancient practice predates modern medicine by hundreds of years. A non-invasive healing treatment, acupuncture — especially when combined with Chinese medicine and herbs — can help you with issues such as constipation and bronchitis. Acupuncture also offers emotional relief for insomnia, stress, and depression. Visit a local acupuncturist for your personalized therapy.

 

Eat for Gut Health

You may be surprised to know that your gut plays a vital role in your overall health, from weight management to your mood levels. That’s because the gut contains many different strains of bacteria, each responsible for specific bodily functions. For example, Bifidobacterium helps to keep your intestines healthy and produces essential vitamins like B12. Meanwhile, L. helveticus and B. longum both act as mood boosters. Keeping a well-balanced environment in your gut will help these bacteria thrive and improve your health. The key is to eat the right foods for your gut and take supplements that promote gut health.

 

Drink More Water

How much water do you drink every day? If you’re like most people, probably nowhere near enough. This is unfortunate because adding a few extra glasses of H2O to your day flushes your kidneys, normalizes bowel function, and can even reduce the risk of cancer. You can add fresh fruit to your glass for a refreshing drink that’s full of flavor if you don’t like plain water.

 

Everything you do has an effect on your health. From sneaking a 30-minute warm bath to lying down on the acupuncture table, the above ideas are simple, inexpensive, and effective ways to give yourself a boost from the inside out. Try a few or try them all. You won’t regret your decision, and you’ll feel much better for it.

 

Image via Pexels

Red Cabbage

IMG_8748.jpg

Just look at that red cabbage… homegrown and harvested from the plot yesterday.

IMG_8751.jpg

It was the first time I have ever grown red cabbages before and I thought it was so beautiful, I decided to eat some. I went from cabbage hater, to ‘green cabbages are ok’ to ‘wow, red cabbages are good cooked too!’

Why should we eat cabbages?

89g of raw cabbage contains –

  • Protein: 1g
  • Fibre: 2g
  • Vitamin K: 85% of the RDI
  • Vitamin C: 54% of the RDI
  • Folate: 10% of the RDI
  • Manganese: 7% of the RDI
  • Vitamin B6: 6% of the RDI
  • Calcium: 4% of the RDI
  • Potassium: 4% of the RDI
  • Magnesium: 3% of the RDI

Vitamin B6 and folate are essential for many important processes in the body, including energy metabolism and the normal functioning of the nervous system. Cabbage is especially high in vitamin C, a potent antioxidant that may protect against heart disease, certain cancers and vision loss. While both green and red cabbage are excellent sources vic C, red cabbage contains about 30% more. One cup (89 grams) of chopped red cabbage packs in 85% of the recommended intake for vitamin C, which is the same amount found in a small orange. So I might avoid Fresher’s flu…

Cruciferous vegetables like cabbage contain many different antioxidants that have been shown to reduce chronic inflammation. Sulforaphane, kaempferol and other antioxidants found in brassicas are likely responsible for their anti-inflammatory effect.

Cabbage is full of gut friendly insoluble fibre, a type of carbohydrate that cannot be broken down in the intestines. Insoluble fiber helps keep the digestive system healthy by adding bulk to stools and promoting regular bowel movements. Cabbage is also rich in soluble fibre which has been shown to increase the number of beneficial bacteria in the gut. These bacteria perform important functions like protecting the immune system and producing critical nutrients like vitamins K2 and B12. Eating cabbage keeps your digestive system happy.

Red cabbage contains powerful compounds called anthocyanins. They give this vegetable its vibrant purple colour. Anthocyanins are plant pigments that belong to the flavonoid family. Many studies have found a link between eating foods rich in this pigment and a reduced risk of heart disease. Cabbage contains more than 36 different kinds of anthocyanins…

IMG_8754.jpg

How to eat it?

Raw is probably best as most of the nutrients will be withheld that can sometimes leave during the cooking process. But I find raw cabbage icky. Steamed is the next best, followed by boiled, roasted, fried.

IMG_8757.jpg

We boiled it and ate our red cabbage with lots of other homegrown produce for dinner – potatoes, sweetcorn, green Savoy cabbage, carrots, runner beans and courgette. It was beautiful and yummy and helped to ease my sore gut that had been suffering all day. See – homegrown produce is so good for you!

IMG_8758.jpg

Update: one more pumpkin left to harvest… the other plants have all turned brown and died from powdery mildew so I cut their fruits off and took them inside to cure (more information here for those who are interested: Curing pumpkins). I’m leaving the last one on to make sure it ripens more and will take it away when the plant finally has to go.

IMG_8755.jpg

Blight has hit the veg garden and the potatoes are starting to go – thank goodness it came so late this year as the main crop potatoes have managed to grow properly before the disease came. The tomatoes are going to suffer and I am expecting a lot of green ones to fall off soon but we did pretty well with the red tomatoes being grown outside this year in this once in a lifetime heatwave.

The autumn harvest of raspberries is being as wonderful as always. We had them last night for dessert along with homemade chocolate brownie ice cream and cookies and cream ice cream (recipes can be found on my Beagle Baking blog:

https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/2018/08/06/chocolate-fudge-brownie-ice-cream/

https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/2018/07/27/cookies-and-cream-ice-cream/  ).

IMG_8763.jpg